Blog

New Blog && 35 Days of Code Progress

July 21, 2019

First of all, welcome to the new space hosted with Gatsby and Netlify! Gatsby has been gathering some traction around the developer circles in the past year or so and wanted to see what the noise was all about. Now I’ve got my own blog starter up and running and hosted for the world. I do still have my old Medium posts that most likely will just become an archive until I move posts over and start fresh.

Speaking of starting fresh, I’ve now “completed” the famous among Codenewbies and freeCodeCampers alike, 100 Days of Code. This challenge is geared for new learners and seasoned developers alike to create a consistent practice of learning code, a new framework, or side project by recording what they worked on everyday for 100 days. There are some other specifics including publicly posting what you did on Twitter, could not be a tutorial, etc where those specifics are on the website above and will go into more detail; I changed mine up a little bit to tailor to my own life routine.

I had attempted this challenge a couple years back that ended about after month during the summer, created to keep the consistency of practicing through the winter when it’s easier to stay inside and pass the time learning, this is which is why my Github repo is called ‘v2.’ I switched up my particular qualifications to be 30min a day, thinking this would easily attainable for my schedule, okay to do tutorials along the way, and post the day’s work on Twitter. I wanted to do this after hearing successes from other coders and to get back into making some side projects and continual learning; it had been a while since I had done any new code and felt it was an easier ramp up.

Some of the projects I had worked on over this time, and documented in my Github repository, were the freeCodeCamp React challenges (drum kit and markdown previewer), began a long full stack Udemy tutorial, and ending with a short MERN (Mongo, ExpressJS, React, Node) tutorial as basis of a future side project. Over the proposed 100 days that began mid spring and just ended this month, calculating my time over days logged, I came out one hour ahead on time over days! No, I did not even get close to 100 days so the time over days is a minute win for me. There were definitely times you can see in my log with mini hiatuses I was either busy, out of town, or didn’t feel like working on something.

I have personally acknowledged some focus and attention issues, mostly stemming from social media usage and other bad habits (working on them!), additionally, where I have heard publicly posting something should keep you more accountable. This is true in that whenever I was tweeting out my work, the 100daysofcode bots would retweet them and that was about the only ‘you did a thing!’ recognition I got. Maybe the reach should have been farther? Or maybe this was a good start, in turn, it could have made me more nervous not to post? I don’t know, my brain is odd like that 😅 I did notice a higher positivity in the beginning, as most new projects do, which could have attributed to the burnout-y feeling and hiatuses.

Over the time of this challenge, my priorities in my day had shifted, another one of my goals this year is to self train to complete a 10k run, where this has also come up as a contender of issues with consistency. Where I’m sure we’d all like to do All The Things™, priorities will always change, making time for what is important in the moment is the best skill. It can be very difficult to have multiple high priorities without burning out on one of them, especially if it’s something you enjoy.

I’m no stranger to feelings of burnout and imposter syndrome, I’m not sure if this challenge helped or negatively impacted it this time around. Now that it’s been a few days since the challenge ended, I’ve focused on some other projects and less antsy about logging and working on something. I do have side projects to add to a board to scope out but I don’t want the menial task of marking down progress everyday as routine and boring. It’s nice to acknowledge how far I’ve grown and I like to track stats to improve on the day before, but this tracking seemed to get turned around and that could be a byproduct of not having a clear set of goals (hey there, lack of focus!). I would love to do another in the future and have learned from this round what to do and not to do over the 100 days to log more days and projects to share.


Written by Haley Elder who lives and works in Portland, OR.